LCNRD Reminds You To Test Your Wells

What's In Your Water
Routine maintenance and inspection of water wells can help protect water quality, ensure your well is operating properly, prolong the useful life of the well system, and protect your investment. Greatest of all of these is the protection of your health, as water quality issues can have adverse health impacts without any detectable indicators. 
May 5, 2020

 

LCNRD Reminds you to Test your Wells

 

The National Ground Water Association (NGWA) and the Lewis & Clark Natural Resources District  (LCNRD) recommend well owners test their well water used for drinking water at least annually for bacteria, nitrates, and any contaminants of local concern. More frequent testing should be considered if any of the following occur:

 

  • Flood water has impacted the well site.
  • There is a change in the taste, odor, or appearance of your water, or if a problem occurs such as a broken well cap, inundation by floodwaters, or the addition of a new contamination source.
  • The well has a history of bacterial contamination.
  • A septic system has recently malfunctioned.
  • Family members or house guests have recurrent incidents of gastrointestinal illness.
  • An infant is living in the home.
  • Or to monitor the efficiency and performance of home water treatment equipment.

 

Routine maintenance and inspection of water wells can help protect water quality, ensure your well is operating properly, prolong the useful life of the well system, and protect your investment. Greatest of all of these is the protection of your health, as water quality issues can have adverse health impacts without any detectable indicators. 

Small problems can often be identified by performing maintenance before they become costly, inconvenient situations. This is similar to performing routine maintenance on a motor vehicle. If you have the oil changed at specified intervals, the engine will operate reliably much longer than if you do not. Do not become stranded without water over the relatively small cost of an annual service call—the cost of a repair call could be much higher. 

At a minimum, wells should be evaluated annually by a licensed or certified water well systems professional. Annual checkups should include: a flow test, visual inspection, a water quality test, checking valves, and electrical testing.

 

A written report should be delivered to you following completion of an annual checkup. The report should include recommendations and all laboratory and other test results. Keep this in a safe place with all other well reports.

 

If possible, develop a relationship with your preferred well contractor. Similar to any other skilled practitioner, the water well systems professional may be available to advise you over the phone if an issue sounds to be like something worth investigating with a service call, or something that can be noted for the next annual checkup.

 

To find out more about testing your wells contact LCNRD or visit http://wellowner.org/.

2020 LCNRD Reminds You to Test your Wells.pdf

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